2010-07-22 -- Seattle to Omaha

That's it! The official part of the trip is over. Everyone is either home or heading home. Dad and I visited the Museum of Flight in the morning, then flew to Omaha. Dinner was, sigh, Wendys -- nobody wanted to cook, nobody wanted to eat at a restaurant, and (oddly) I think we missed good ol' american fast food.

The Museum of Flight was excellent. Lots of history here, quite a few interesting planes, and a lot of famous planes.

Some interesting bits that have no photos:

Miss Veedol - A Bellanca Skyrocket. On July 28th, 1931, Clyde Pangborn and Hugh Herndon, Jr tried to break the around the world record set by the Graf Zeppelin in 1929 of 20 days 4 hours (Wiley Post and Harold Getty beat them to it in June: 8 days 15 hours 15 minutes). When they reached Siberia, they were so far behind schedule that they instead went to Japan to try to be the first to fly non-stop from Japan to the United States. They estimated that they could increase range by 500 miles if they jettisoned the landing gear in flight. The Spirit of Wenatchee is attempting to recreate the flight.

A wall contained several photographs by Paul J Madden (1920-2004) from World War II. They were stunning, but I cannot find a single trace of him on the web.


Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 32.0 mm; 1/50 sec, f/4.0, ISO 3200
This is a terrible picture of the complicated fuel management system of a Boeing B-52 Stratofortress. Here is another picture of the same thing.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 24.0 mm; 1/5 sec, f/4.0, ISO 1600
'Big Stud', a Republic P-47D Thunderbolt.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 28.0 mm; 1/25 sec, f/4.0, ISO 3200
An Aviatik D.I (Museum of Flight page). I liked the camoflauge / colors.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II at 17.0 mm; 1/13 sec, f/6.4, ISO 3200
The World War II Fighters gallery, from the stairway up to the World War I Fighters gallery.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 67.0 mm; 1/125 sec, f/4.0, ISO 800
Cockpit of the Concorde, showing some of the radio/navigation station.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 67.0 mm; 1/200 sec, f/4.0, ISO 800
Cockpit of the Concorde, no radio/nav, but this one is in focus.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II at 16.0 mm; 1/400 sec, f/8.0, ISO 200
Boeing 737 Prototype, the 'baby Boeing'. First flight on April 9th, 1967, then used as a test aircraft until it was the Transport Systems Research Vehicle for NASA in 1974. It tested lots of technology -- virtual cockpit, electronic flight displays and airporne wind shear detection.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II at 16.0 mm; 1/320 sec, f/8.0, ISO 200
The nose gear door (and space) on Boeing 747 serial number 001. First flight on February 9th, 1969, served its remaining years as a testbed for 747 systems and engines. The yellow blocks are, I guess, weights to hold the plane in place.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II at 20.0 mm; 1/640 sec, f/8.0, ISO 200
Boeing 747 serial number 001. Shortly after I took this picture (with the wide angle lens), one of the 787's took off over it.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 50.0 mm; 1/60 sec, f/8.0, ISO 200
This odd plane is the Lear Fan LF 2100, N626BL. (airliners.net)



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 24.0 mm; 1/60 sec, f/8.0, ISO 200
The Great Gallery of the Museum of Flight.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 55.0 mm; 1/60 sec, f/8.0, ISO 200
The SR-71 Blackbird (Museum of Flight page), M-21 variant. The odd thing on its back is the D-21 drone, actually launched from the Blackbird for survelience. This is the only surviving M-21, the other was destroyed during a drone launching.



Canon PowerShot A3100 IS at 6.2 mm; 1/250 sec, f/8.0, ISO 80
And there it is, the Boeing 787.



Canon PowerShot A3100 IS at 6.2 mm; 1/30 sec, f/2.7, ISO 80
Holy cow! Traffic! I'm counting 15 planes, all behind us, fortunately.



Canon PowerShot A3100 IS at 24.8 mm; 1/160 sec, f/16.0, ISO 80
Mount Hood, I think. I now hate this camera; its focus is terrible. Yes, I wanted the wing to be in focus, and not the gigantic mountain.



Canon PowerShot A3100 IS at 6.2 mm; 1/40 sec, f/2.7, ISO 80
85kt tail wind! This put us at a ground speed of around 380kts.



Canon PowerShot A3100 IS at 6.2 mm; 1/30 sec, f/2.7, ISO 100
The winds on the route.



Canon PowerShot A3100 IS at 7.8 mm; 1/50 sec, f/2.8, ISO 80
Too bad the winds led us straight to a rather nasty storm. All we heard on the radio were people diverting around this guy.



Canon PowerShot A3100 IS at 6.2 mm; 1/320 sec, f/8.0, ISO 80
What did it look like? A big nasty cloud. Radar wasn't showing anything in front of us, and we just went through it. Right before entering it, ATC asked us if we wanted to divert around the storm. Heh, yeah, we saw the storm, but thanks for reminding us.



Canon PowerShot A3100 IS at 6.2 mm; 1/20 sec, f/2.7, ISO 400
All done! 29,056nm to get around the world. 28,814nm shown plus 242nm, since we didn't reset the trip odometer until halfway to Canada.



Canon PowerShot A3100 IS at 6.2 mm; 1/25 sec, f/2.7, ISO 400
And we did it in 107.3 hours of flight. We started with 464.9 hours on the plane, and ended with 572.2.



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