2010-07-21 -- Anchorage to Seattle

Since we skipped the Alaska Aviation Heritage Museum yesterday, we delayed our departure today to visit it first. The museum is packed with photos and stories from the first half of the 20th century. A handful of planes; if you want to see planes, this isn't the museum for you. If you want history, this is the place.

In 1924, the Douglas World Cruisers (boeing page) (centennial of flight) (seattle world cruiser page, map of the route) circumnavigated the globe. They flew 26,345 miles (22,893 nm) in 175 days. They left Seattle April 6th 1924, and returned September 29, 1924; 175 days. They flew for 363 hours, 7 minutes, averaging 72.5 mph (32 kts). They made 69 (scheduled) stops. Their longest leg was 830 miles (721 nm) from Iceland to Greenland. The Alaska connection is that one of the four planes (the Seattle) flew into a mountain near Port Moller in Alaska. The museum has some of the wreckageA on display. The Chicago is in the National Air and Space Museum.

After a couple of hours at the museum, we jumped into the plane, no customs, no immigration, no filing and refiling flight plans, no arguing with the fuel guys, etc, etc.....it is good to be back! The flight was (as expected) boring. A nice tail wind, though, but cloudy most of the way. A bit of fun on the way out: we were first assigned to runway 7L (holding at intersection E), but then reassigned to runway 32 due to excessive traffic landing on 7L. A few minutes later (still holding at E) we were reassigned back to 7L, finally told to position and hold (after the 747 lands, before the 737 on final), but do it a bit to the south so that someone could cross 7L behind us, and to expedite departure. "Thanks for the help, sierra juliet".

Dinner was at the Restaurant at the top of the Space Needle. I got a spinach salad (with goat cheese and strawberries) and short ribs. The salad was great, the ribs had a bit too much fat on them for my taste. The beer was a Mac & Jack's (Redmond, WA) African Amber, that was tasty (ratebeer.com).


Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II at 16.0 mm; 1/100 sec, f/6.4, ISO 800
A heavily modified Benson Auto Gyro. It crashed into 90 foot tall trees in 2006.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II at 16.0 mm; 1/60 sec, f/6.4, ISO 800
Somewhat closeup of the cockpit of the Benson Auto Gyro.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 24.0 mm; 1/50 sec, f/6.4, ISO 800
Somewhat closeup of the cockpit of the Benson Auto Gyro.



Canon PowerShot A3100 IS at 11.4 mm; 1/125 sec, f/10.0, ISO 80
A Douglas DC-3, N44587 (airliners.net) (flightaware.com) operated by Desert Air. Read more.

Here's a fantastic page about all the prop-liners flying around in Alaska.



Canon PowerShot A3100 IS at 6.2 mm; 1/50 sec, f/2.7, ISO 80
Our route from PANC to KBFI, nicely showing off the great circle. Too bad the fuel ring doesn't quite make it to the destination. Hope we get to altitude soon....



Canon PowerShot A3100 IS at 6.2 mm; 1/640 sec, f/8.0, ISO 80
Mountains with snow! And clouds too.



Canon PowerShot A3100 IS at 6.2 mm; 1/200 sec, f/8.0, ISO 80
Boeing Field.



Canon PowerShot A3100 IS at 6.2 mm; 1/80 sec, f/8.0, ISO 80
Parking was a bit tight at 'Wings Aloft'.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 92.0 mm; 1/500 sec, f/7.0, ISO 800
Mount Hood, behind some docks, behind a ferry, at sunset, with the moon.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM at 200.0 mm; 1/200 sec, f/3.5, ISO 1600
I think I'm a little tired. I took maybe ten photos from the Space Needle, none from outside. This is the only slightly decent one.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 28.0 mm; 0.4 sec, f/4.0, ISO 800
The Space Needle. We made a quick trip to the top after dinner, then called it a day.



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