2010-06-29 -- Darwin to Bali

OK, great! We're in Darwin, Australia! ....and have no ideas what to actually do here. We asked the lady at the hotel desk for suggestions, and she looked at us like we were mad. Do? In Darwin?! After a bit of grilling, and no suggestions later, we gave up and walked down the pier (the hotel is next to the pier) to see the United States Navy (a couple of cruiser-ish ships and a smaller aircraft carrier) that are here for leave. We politely ask if we can see the ships, and the guard tells us "absolutely not".

We hired a taxi to give us a tour of Darwin. He meanders around the part of Darwin on the hill, through some parks, through a section built on reclaimed ground, by the harbor that the longest submarine net (in world war two) was strung across, and drops us off at the Darwin Military Museum (wikipedia).

The plan now is to head back to the hotel to pick up our bags, get a haircut, taxi out to the airport stopping at the Darwin Air Museum. We successfully picked up our bags (I changed into the flight uniform, Dad changed into the pants of the flight uniform, and Guilliame didn't change at all), and headed back to the pier for haircuts only to find they were booked solid. The other salon (salon?) was a short walk away, and they had openings, so we walked there.....and spent about an hour for two haircuts (Dad and Guilliame; I didn't get mine cut. Salon.) This also left us with zero time for the air museum, so we grabbed a cab, picked up the bags, and headed to the airport.

With a bit of difficultity we located the handler (tip: ask the handler where to go before he drops you off at the hotel), cleared paperwork, etc, etc, grabbed a few Stubbies, walked through the departures (with Stubbies in hand, and pilots uniforms on) a few times, and blasted off. (In reality, this probably took about an hour; the general declarations were wrong, and needed to be fixed; paperwork is always slow; the Stubbies were only to be found in arrivals, not departures, etc, etc)

Nothing eventful happened on the flight back, but a slight headwind annoyed us. I'm positive I took a long nap, since the flight seemed pretty short, certainly shorter than three and a half hours. Sitting in the back of the plane this time (Guilliame and I shared right seat for the Bali-Darwin and Darwin-Bali legs) I captured a nice night landing into Bali on video. We got to the resort quite late, about 8:30pm, just as the rest of the group was finishing dinner.


Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II at 16.0 mm; 1/6 sec, f/5.7, ISO 200
At the Darwin War Museum, a Hinomaru yosegaki (good luck flag). Another example. Another example.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II at 16.0 mm; 1/20 sec, f/2.8, ISO 400
Plaque:

"Allison V1710 Engine and Propellor"

This engine and propellor assembly was recovered from a P-40 kittyhawk (aircraft number 68) after it was separated from the fuselage during a forced landing conducted by Second Lieutenant WB Harris on the 15th of June 1942, around 20 kilometres east of Point Blaize, which lies west of Darwin. Lieutenant Morris, serving with the United States Army Air Corps, survived the landing.

The Kittyhawk, a single-endinged low-wing fighter, was usually no match for the Japanese Zero, but managed to provide some deterrence for incoming enemy bombers during 1942. Eleven of them were active in the two raids on Darwin on 19 February 1942.

The Allison V1710 engine is a conventional, overhead cam, liquid cooled Vee-type engine using two 6-cylinder monoblocks bolted to a split crankcase. The 12 cylinder 60 degree Vee, is liquid cooled and in most variants has a supercharger contained in the accessory housing.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II at 16.0 mm; 1/30 sec, f/4.0, ISO 1600
Below one of the gun emplacements. The guns were long ago sold to Japan for scrap metal, but the emplacements still survive. From what I can guess, the gun turret turns (the big green thing on the right side), and the shells are loaded onto a cart on the circular track. Wherever the gun is pointing, the cart can move there, and the shell loaded.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II at 23.0 mm; 1/50 sec, f/4.0, ISO 200
Plaque:

"Naval Searchlight"

Known by the title of "Projector, Fortress", searchlights of this type were used to spot enemy ships so they could be targeted by shore guns.

With a range of around 25 kilometres, depending on conditions, the lights burnt a magnesium rod that was reflected to give a brilliant light. Operating in conjuction with rangefinder crews who would communicate via the gun system's telephone network, once the target was illuminated and the range known, the enemy ship could be fired at by the guns.



Canon PowerShot A3100 IS at 6.2 mm; 1/60 sec, f/2.7, ISO 400
Guilliame, one half second after the end of his haircut. Dad and I went out for a Coke during this. Tip: Get some local currency if you want to have a small snack, or at least check what the minimum charge for a credit card is. AU$20 is a bit steep for two cokes. I argued them down to US$7.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 24.0 mm; 1/500 sec, f/8.0, ISO 200
N850SJ and the fuel truck, all alone in Darwin.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 50.0 mm; 1/500 sec, f/8.0, ISO 200



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 24.0 mm; 1/1250 sec, f/6.4, ISO 200



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 105.0 mm; 1/200 sec, f/8.0, ISO 200
Lined up and waiting for departure. The red display is showing terrain, and since we're sitting on the ground, it's all red (i.e., we're dead). Note the excessively detailed routing; I believe they gave us direct so some far away waypoint after takeoff.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 24.0 mm; 1/640 sec, f/5.0, ISO 200
Pretty clouds, somewhere between Darwin and Bali. Probably closer to Bali, looks like the sun is going down.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 105.0 mm; 1/250 sec, f/5.0, ISO 200
Islands south-east of Indonesia, with cloudy sunset.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 24.0 mm; 1/60 sec, f/5.0, ISO 200
Flying west into the sunset, tiring on the pilots, pretty at the end.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 47.0 mm; 1/125 sec, f/4.0, ISO 200
Mount something in Indonesia.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 98.0 mm; 1/10 sec, f/4.0, ISO 1600
The large hole in the ground from the day before. Looks like it is still active at night.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 70.0 mm; 1/8 sec, f/4.0, ISO 3200



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 28.0 mm; 1/25 sec, f/4.0, ISO 3200
Singapore Airlines Boeing 777-212/ER, tail number 9V-SRO, in Bali.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 32.0 mm; 1/20 sec, f/4.0, ISO 3200
Checking the fuel before fueling. Yes, they pumped a bit of fuel into a bucket, showed us the results, and asked if that was acceptable.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 45.0 mm; 1/13 sec, f/4.0, ISO 3200
Dad, deciding which additive goes where.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS at 28.0 mm; 1/13 sec, f/4.0, ISO 3200



Canon PowerShot A3100 IS at 6.2 mm; 0.3 sec, f/2.7, ISO 800
I know this is VERY hard to see here (I need to crop it); in Bali, this line man was directing an airliner to park by standing on top of a van (in front of the bus). Traffic on both sides of this was stopped; it appeared to be quite a normal occurrance.



Canon PowerShot A3100 IS at 6.2 mm; 1/13 sec, f/2.7, ISO 800
Dinner was an excellent curry (that I fail to remember the name of -- possibly massaman) with red and yellow rice.



FreeBSD!
anyone@walenz.org. Last touched on Friday, July 9, 2010.
Thanks to the spammers, you've got to read this to know that anyone should be replaced with bri.